2015 Hybrid Guide

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Golf Discount’s 2015 Hybrid Guide

author-bob-gomavitz
By Bob Gomavitz

Being an absolute equipment junkie, I was approached by GolfDiscount.com to write reviews and share my findings with you. Having been chosen to write a number of Taylormade product reviews for GolfWRX.com I felt that this would be an excellent opportunity put my knowledge to use.

Hybrids are a very finicky club. Some people love them and others hate them. It’s important to know why you want a hybrid in your bag. I found them to be my best friend once I found out what style fit my game and why. I will carry up to 3 hybrids in my bag depending on the situation. My game has improved because of hybrids, and it should for most of you, once you understand how to use them. Some players need consistent distance to fill yardage gaps, hit lay up points, a longer club they can softly land on greens, while others are seek an increase in length, height, or a rescue club to get out of deeper rough. I did not include “off the tee” or “out of the rough” in the review of the 2015 hybrids because I felt that information would be too confusing with the three different hybrid styles.

The three distinct types of hybrids on the market are the smaller, less forgiving style that offers less spin and a lower flight(due to the CG location), and preferred by better players; the more classic style used by a wider range of players that has a slightly higher flight and more forgiveness; and finally the larger head style for players who find it challenging to get the ball into the air offer even more forgiveness.

A few of the reasons why there is a love/hate affair with hybrids is because a large amount of players find them to be “hook machines”, and I will reference a draw bias in some of my reviews. The majority of the hybrids offer an offset head which helps a vast amount of players who fade or slice the ball. Most of the hybrids are too upright causing the toe to be up in the air, which causes the toe flip over quicker. Many players tend to hit their hybrids like a fairway wood and not like an iron. Players tee the ball up too high, which I feel tends to result in a hook more often than when the ball is teed up lower.

Testing was done at Newcastle Golf Course, along with Maplewood Golf Course, which is my home track.

Check out the NEW 2016 Hybrids Guide!



Adams Blue Hybrid

Adams Blue Hybrid

  • Velocity Slot Technology
  • Low/Back CG
  • Slim Tech Shaft
  • 125cc Head


Read The Review


Adams Red Hybrid

Adams Red Hybrid

  • Velocity Slot Technology
  • Ghost Slot Technology
  • Matrix Altus Tour Shaft
  • 95cc Head


Read The Review


Big Bertha Alpha 815 Hybrid

Big Bertha Alpha 815 Hybrid

  • Controlled Trajectory
  • Compact Head Shape
  • OptiFit Adjustability
  • Fujikura Speeder 865 Shaft


Read The Review


Callaway XR Pro Hybrid

Callaway XR Pro Hybrid

  • High MOI
  • Lower CG
  • Increased Ball Speed
  • Project X LZ Shaft


Read The Review


Cobra Fly-Z Hybrid

Cobra Fly-Z Hybrid

  • Back CG
  • Speed Channel Face
  • MyFly8 Adjustability
  • Matrix VLCT Altus Shaft


Read The Review


Mizuno JPX-850 Hybrid

Mizuno JPX-850 Hybrid

  • Shock Wave Sole
  • Low CG
  • Hot Metal Face
  • Fujikura Motore Shaft


Read The Review



Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid

Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid

  • FlyBeam Structure
  • Low CG
  • FlexLoft2 Adjustability
  • Diamana S+ Blue Board Shaft


Read The Review


Ping G30 Hybrid

Ping G30 Hybrid

  • High MOI
  • Heat Treated Face
  • Progressive CG Locations
  • TFC 419H Shaft


Read The Review


Tour Edge Exotics E8 Hybrid

Tour Edge Exotics E8 Hybrid

  • Low/Front CG
  • Forged Cup Face
  • Heel/Toe Sole Relief
  • UST Recoil Shaft


Read The Review


TaylorMade AeroBurner Hybrid

AeroBurner Hybrid

  • Speed Pocket
  • Aerodynamic Face Shape
  • Thick-Thin Crown Technology
  • Matrix Speed RUL-Z 70 Shaft


Read The Review


TaylorMade R15 Hybrid

TaylorMade R15 Hybrid

  • Central CG
  • Compact Shape
  • Loft Sleeve Adjustability
  • Fujikura Speeder 77 Shaft


Read The Review


TaylorMade R15 TP Hybrid

TaylorMade R15 TP Hybrid

  • Central CG
  • Compact Shape
  • Loft Sleeve Adjustability
  • Fujikura Sppeder 869 Shaft


Read The Review



Titleist 915Hd Hybrid

Titleist 915Hd Hybrid

  • Active Recoil Channel
  • Ultra Thin Face
  • SureFit Tour Hosel
  • Adila Rogue Black 85H Shaft


Read The Review

Adams Blue Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Adams Blue Hybrid offers the Velocity Slot on the sole unlike past versions, which offered the slot on the crown and the sole (I never liked the slot on the crown). Looks-wise, the head stands out with a soothing blue crown that fades out a bit going away from the face. This provides an interesting visual alignment aid to help you square the face up to the target. There is some offset to this 125cc head, which will give it a slightly closed look. After hitting a few shots I found the Blue to feel solid and had a nice sound to it. Elevating the ball was plain simple for me, and should be for most players.

Who’s it for?

Adams is known for making excellent Hybrids, and this is yet another great choice for those with serious issues elevating long and mid irons. This model offers multiple loft options with a 3 through 6 in their lineup.

Final Take

The first thing that I noticed when I put the Blue in my hands was the size of the grip, super small! This is because of Adams SlimTech Shaft Technology, allowing for more shaft kick and an easier launch. You will find this to be the case throughout their lineup, so please take note. The Blue is targeted for the majority of the golfers out there with mid to higher handicaps who struggle with long to mid irons. The Blue Hybrids are made to make that part of the game fun again, and I am guessing that they will indeed do this for many of you.

Shop Adams Blue Hybrid


Adams Red Hybrid

The Takeaway

Being a leader in the Hybrid category, Adams did not let up with the new Red version. Shape-wise, you have that classic smaller-sized head (95cc) with the higher box-shaped toe. The simple black crown is missing the Velocity Slot from the past offering, and this is because Adams incorporated a Ghost Slot under the crown, instead of on top of the crown. Yes! You still get dual Slot Technology to increase ball speed across the face, but you just do not see it at address anymore. The feel was dead solid with a slight click at impact, which provides excellent feedback to your hands. The Red also incorporates three transferable weights on the sole to create a different bias and flight shape if desired. I was very pleased to see the Matrix Altus shaft as the stock offering. This is an excellent Hybrid shaft for a wide range of players.

Who’s it for?

Adams has been making hybrids that perform at a very high level for years. This version will touch base with players that have a mid to lower handicap, and who need to keep their ball flight down. The resulting strike produces a more penetrating flight, but still high enough to land the ball softly on the green.

Final Take

I, myself, have always found the shape of the Adams Hybrids to be a bit to small and too boxy in the toe area, and this one is not much different. I did find that it produced excellent shot shape, feel and a penetrating ball flight, all which are very important to me when I am looking for a hybrid. However, I did not test the sole weight system to see if I could create some fade bias, which is also very important for my game. If you are an Adams fan, the new Red will not disappoint one bit. I can’t wait to see Langer loft one of these onto a Par 5 at The Masters!

Shop Adams Red Hybrid


Callaway Big Bertha Hybrid

The Takeaway

Back in the day of the original Big Bertha, there was no such thing as a hybrid. So, for 2015 Callaway introduces its first ever Big Bertha Hybrid. The Big Bertha Hybrid is designed to produce distance. Being very easy to launch, the added benefits of adjustability make it a great fit for a large group of players who do not swing at warp speed. The slightly larger offset head is clean and simple, and like most Callaway products is easy on the eyes.

Who’s it for?

The Big Bertha Hybrid is for those that produce a mid to lower swing speed, and want the club to do the work for them. What I mean by that is that the Callaway Big Bertha Hybrid is very easy to swing and it feels like the club is doing the work, but in actuality you will have to do the work to make it work for you.

Final Take

I struggled with the Big Bertha Driver and Fairway Wood, but saw marked improvement with the hybrid. The UST Recoil shaft really caught my interest with super-tight dispersion and less spin than I saw from the driver and fairway wood. My distance suffered some due to high spin, but any club that goes as straight as this one did has my attention. This club should really perform well for those whose swing speed is slightly below average or slower.

Shop Callaway Big Bertha Hybrid


Callaway Big Bertha Alpha 815 Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Big Bertha Alpha 815 sort of reminded me of the XR Pro shape. A smaller, tapered head that features a higher, box-shaped toe that tapers off towards the heel area, but with less offset. This is a very successful shape used by Callaway, especially with lower handicap players. It also features their OptiFit system and a low, forward sole weight to reduce spin. The head is a clean, all-black colorway and sets up to the ball very square.

Who’s it for?

Callaway has the lower to mid-lower handicap player in mind, to even a mid-level handicap that might have issues hooking their hybrids. The shape, design and features also seem to really fit the needs of the more “techie-type” players.

Final Take

Like the XR Pro, I had huge issues with the 815 Alpha Big Bertha. With the 23-degree head that I tried, my spin rate was too high and created a very high launch angle. As a result, my distance suffered greatly. Much like the distance control, my dispersion was very good, however the distance was too close to the distance of my 5 iron for my liking. I also got the same feeling that the club really sat upright in my hands like the XR Pro version. My guess is that I needed more time dialing this head in via the OptiFit system to see better results.

Shop Callaway Big Bertha Alpha 815 Hybrid


Callaway XR Hybrid

The Takeaway

The XR is sure one good looking hybrid, The clean, flat-black head, and Chevron alignment aid make this hybrid simple, yet effective looking. Sitting slightly closed, and with a slightly larger head, the XR has more offset compared to the Pro Version. Callaway claims that this head has a CG that is 46% lower than the X2 Hot version.

Who’s it for?

The XR should meet the needs of a very large group of players that are looking for a hybrid that produces very good length, solid feel and is easy to elevate.

Final Take

After finding a nice surprise with the XR Fairway Wood, I was excited to see what the hybrid would do for me. Again, I saw great results from the XR hybrid in distance, ball flight and feel. It did not sit as upright in my hands as the Pro version did, and something that baffled me was the huge difference in ball flight and spin compared to the Pro version. I did, however, see too much draw bias from the XR for my liking, but this is a positive for the majority of the players out there. There is just something about the XR hybrids and woods that have me scratching my head.

Shop Callaway XR Hybrid


Callaway XR Pro Hybrid

The Takeaway

The XR Pro is sure one good looking hybrid. Its flat-black, clean head is simple, yet effective looking. The head sits pretty square, and I would guess it has less offset when compared to the non-Pro Version. Callaway claims that this head has the lowest CG ever for a hybrid, and I believe them because my ball flight was very high!

Who’s it for?

The XR Pro version is more for the player who prefers less offset (which can lead to less of a draw bias) and a higher grade shaft. I would also suggest that those looking to land the ball softly on the green like an iron will enjoy the XR Pro.

Final Take

This head was a bit of a dilemma for me. First off, the head shape is small, and with a very tall toe area tapering off quite a bit towards the heel area gave me the illusion that the club was sitting in a very upright position in my hands. And secondly, the distance was quite a bit off compared to all the other clubs that I tried. The 23-degree head certainly looked to have more loft to my eye than the stamped amount. Not once did I get a semi-penetrating shot. Based on the results, I kept thinking twice about the actual loft since every shot was super high and had too much spin. Great looks, solid feel but something just did not work for me with this one.

Shop Callaway XR Pro Hybrid


Cobra Fly-Z Hybrid

The Takeaway

I tested the 2-3H Fly-Z at the 19 degree setting in the black colorway, even though you can pretty much pick your favorite colorway when you grab one. With the MyFly8 adjustment you can cover a nice range of lofts from hybrid to hybrid. The 19 degree setting that I tested was the high end of loft for the 2-3H version, which means a slightly longer shaft when compared to the 3-4H version that still offers up a 19 degree setting. The Fly-Z was one of the lowest lofted heads that I tested, and it still produced a quick elevation with great control. Like the majority of the heads tested, I saw a slight draw bias with this model, but nothing too drastic.

Who’s it for?

Cobra has done a great job creating a model that will fit a very large range of players with the Fly-Z. With the slight overlapping of loft settings and different length shafts available, players should be able to find a setting and length to help fill a certain distance gap, which for some is their main goal with a hybrid.

Final Take

Simple to adjust, easy to swing and has a ball flight that I look for from a Hybrid, the Fly-Z is a very nice hybrid by Cobra, and I enjoyed testing it. The Fly-Z had a nice and high ball flight, but does not produce too much spin. At address, I felt the Fly-Z looked just a wee bit busy for my taste. After a few swings I really liked the feel and the ball flight, which quickly made me forget about that busy look as good results tend to do.

Shop Cobra Fly-Z Hybrid


Mizuno JPX-850 Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Mizuno JPX-850 Hybrid incorporates the Shock Wave Sole, which flexes to increase the energy transferred to the ball at impact. The low, back CG creates an easy launch, while the Hot Metal Face maximizes ball speeds.

Who’s it for?

Mid-Low to Higher handicap players who need help elevating the golf ball should look at the JPX-850. The flatter, larger footprint is a key sign that a low, rear CG is in place to help you get the ball airborne.

Final Take

I struggled with the JPX-850. I either saw a very high flight or a thin, low shot. Out of the hybrids that I tested, this was the only one I thinned. I love the colorway and the quality Fujikura shaft that comes standard with it, but for my game I just did not see the results that I needed to see from this hybrid.

Shop Mizuno JPX-850 Hybrid


Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid, like the Vapor Speed Hybrid incorporates the Covert Cavity from last year’s Covert Hybrid, which allows the Compression Channel to flex more at impact, increasing ball speed. The Cavity also increases the MOI by positioning more weight on the edges, resulting in a resistance to twisting and increased forgiveness. The Flex version is slightly shallower and has a smaller head shape than the Speed version, and has a very square-looking face. Additionally, unlike the Speed version, the Flex is decked out in a stunning all-black colorway. The lowest groove on the face is white, providing a nice alignment guide while addressing the ball.

Who’s it for?

The Vapor Flex with its FlexLoft2 adjustment hosel, and smaller head design is best for better players than the Speed version.

Final Take

I found the Vapor Flex to have a very appealing look to it, but the extra wide hosel area for the FlexLoft2 sleeve is quite bulky and stands out against this slightly smaller head. To make this head a gem I would love to see a smoother transition between head and adjustable sleeve. Though, the head was very solid and produced a crisp sound that will appeal to most players. Finally, the ball flight was good, but not the best tested, as it was a little high for my liking.

Shop Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid


Nike Vapor Speed Hybrid

The Takeaway

I tested a 20-degree Nike Vapor Speed Hybrid, which was a slightly lower loft than the majority of the heads that I tried. This hybrid from Nike is their “point and shoot” offering, with no adjustability to it. A simple, glossy, and clean black head with a metallic face. The Vapor Speed club has a larger head size, and sat a bit closed to my eye. This is most likely due to the fact that most hybrids appear to have a larger head size because of the offset in place.

Who’s it for?

The Vapor Speed is more for the mid to higher handicap player that does not need any adjustability features, and just wants a simple “point and shoot” head that feels good and elevates off the deck nicely.

Final Take

Like the fairway version of this model, I again found the hybrid to be very long with a solid feel. I did see a constant draw with this head like I do more often than not with any hybrid that does not feature some adjustability or some sort of fade-bias built in. I would love to bag a club like this based on the feel, the distance and penetrating ball flight. However, it’s more for those that fade the ball than a hooker like me.

Shop Nike Vapor Speed Hybrid


Ping G30 Hybrid

The Takeaway

Like the driver and fairway versions, the Ping G30 Hybrid is again a very simple, yet effective club. The one difference is this time the hybrid does not have the Turbulators on the crown. The G30 has progressive CG locations and offsets to ensure trajectories and gapping, which is very important with your hybrids. The G30’s sole is flatter than I tend to see when compared with the other OEM’s offerings. Another noticeable difference is a lower profile head. This simple clean head sits very well at address, and looks easy to hit; neither too large, nor too small.

Who’s it for?

Ping does about as good as job as anyone at making clubs that can fit a large range of players, and the G30 Hybrid is yet another example.

Final Take

Though it did not feature that wicked, cracking noise like the driver did, it did provide me with a solid feeling that I liked. The ball flight was a touch high for the 22 degree head that I tested, but the spin was controlled enough to not cause any ballooning. The G30 hybrid is another excellent club by Ping that will be liked by many.

Shop Ping G30 Hybrid


Tour Edge Exotics E8 Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Tour Edge Exotics E8 Hybrid offers a Forged Cup Face, an Adjustable Sole Weight that aids in CG position, and a Power Grid that flexes at impact to increase ball speeds off of the face. Like the past E8 offerings, the head is very clean and simple with a flat-black colorway. The E8 features the UST Recoil Graphite shaft, which is not offered by very many other OEM’s, even though it has been a great success in irons since its release.

Who’s it for?

The Exotics E8 will fit a large group of players. With the adjustable sole weight (kit sold separately), one can change the CG to produce different ball flights. With the stock weight installed I would suggest this head would fit all but the high swing speed players.

Final Take

At address, the E8 Hybrid looks quite differently than other hybrids. I see a longer, more square face design. Longer meaning that the toe to heel area has less of a bulge and roll. I noticed this on the driver and fairway woods, also. To me, this look appears more normal on those two, but on the hybrid it definitely presents a unique shape to my eye. I am not saying it’s a good thing or bad thing, it’s just worth noting its difference compared to other hybrids I tend to see. I have tried a wide variety of hybrid shafts, and I really liked the Recoil shaft because it produced some of the tightest dispersion of any of the shafts that I have tried. This set up produced a solid ball flight with easy to launch conditions. The head might look slightly different, but it produced solid shots time-in and time-out, it just wasn’t particularly long.

Shop Tour Edge Exotics E8 Hybrid


TaylorMade AeroBurner Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Burner name is back this year with the all new AeroBurner lineup. With its aerodynamic features, the AeroBurner is all about speed, and from my testing I believe it! For those that enjoyed the White colorway, it’s back for 2015, which looks great when the ball is framed up against the all-black face. Head size is on the thin side, but not by much. This version sits slightly closed to my eye, and has a much lighter, slightly longer shaft compared to the TP version.

Who’s it for?

Like distance from a Hybrid? The AeroBurner will be on the top of the list when it comes to distance. I found this to have a nice and high penetrating flight that carries really well. This version has a bit more draw bias, which will help those that need it.

Final Take

The non-TP version does not fit my game nearly as well as the TP version that I just bagged. It still feels solid with a nice clean sound, launches plenty high with a moderate spin rate, and is an ease to swing. The club gives you the feeling that the ball is jumping off the face at times, which is a sensational feeling and one that you cannot get enough of. Either of the two AeroBurner models need to be on your list of must try and quite possibly, must buy.

Shop TaylorMade AeroBurner Hybrid


TaylorMade AeroBurner Hybrid

The Takeaway

The Burner name is back this year with the all new AeroBurner lineup. Like the driver and fairway version, the TP hybrid model offers a flatter lie angle, a fade-biased face, shorter length, and an upgraded shaft. With its aerodynamic features, the AeroBurner is all about speed, and from my testing I believe it! Also the white colorway is back for 2015, which looks great when the ball is framed up against the all-black face. Size-wise, the AeroBurner TP is slightly thinner looking than other hybrids currently on the market.

Who’s it for?

The AeroBurner TP, because of the flatter lie angle and slightly open clubface, is mainly for those that tend to hook hybrids off the map. Any handicap range that fights a hook should have a look at this model.

Final Take

First off, this thing is long…Like, wow long! The jump from this head is something else. The feel is really solid and without the slight harshness that I got from the fairway head. To me, the ball sort of had a spring like feeling off the face. The ball flight is high and flat, and more like an optimal flight for a driver than a hybrid. I quickly put an 18 degree into my bag and so far so good. My only concern to date is that my mishits on the toe can be really snappy. Both AeroBurner models are a must try.

Shop TaylorMade AeroBurner TP Hybrid


TaylorMade R15 Hybrid

The Takeaway

This is the first TaylorMade hybrid (rescue) that seems to be infused with the Adams blood lines, since their acquisition of Adams. The shape is more Tour inspired and slightly smaller(98cc) than past offerings(103cc). Additionally, this club’s adjustability allows up to 3 degrees of different settings. This adjustability gives players a hybrid that can be really flexible. Through my testing I found that the R15 produced a simple, solid feel with a more muted sound. Ball flight-wise, I saw a slightly lower, penetrating flight. Even though I saw a slightly lower flight, I was not concerned with a player’s ability to elevate the ball quickly enough with the R15.

Who’s it for?

The R15 is more of a player’s hybrid with its small compact looks, boxy toe area and penetrating flight, which also makes it an excellent choice off the tee.

Final Take

Looking down I see more of an Adams shape than I see of the past TaylorMade rescues. I love the adjustability that comes with the R15 head. Being able to adjust face and lie angles are must for a player like myself. Add in a very solid feel and a consistent ball flight from shot to shot, and the R15 delivers the goods. TaylorMade has gone back to the White colorway with the R15 and some will like this, while others will not.

Shop TaylorMade R15 Hybrid


TaylorMade R15 TP Hybrid

The Takeaway

This is the first TaylorMade hybrid (rescue) that seems to be infused with the Adams blood lines, since their acquisition of Adams. The shape is more Tour inspired and slightly smaller(98cc) than past offerings(103cc). Additionally, this club’s adjustability allows up to 3 degrees of different settings. This adjustability gives players a hybrid that can be really flexible. The TP(Tour Preferred) version incorporates a higher quality, heavier shaft over the non TP version, and that is about it for the difference between the two versions. Through my testing I found that the R15 produced a simple, solid feel with a more muted sound. Ball flight-wise, I saw a slightly lower, penetrating flight. Even though I saw a slightly lower flight, I was not concerned with a player’s ability to elevate the ball quickly enough with the R15.

Who’s it for?

The R15 is more of a player’s hybrid with its small compact looks, boxy toe area and penetrating flight, which also makes it an excellent choice off the tee.

Final Take

Looking down I see more of an Adams shape than I see of the past TaylorMade rescues. The White colorway is back with the R15, and some will like this, while others will not. I love the adjustability that comes with the R15 TP head. Being able to adjust face and lie angles are must for players like myself. I also enjoyed the shaft selection for the TP version because it added some stability to my shots. Adding in a very solid feel and a consistent ball flight from shot to shot, and the R15 delivers the goods.

Shop TaylorMade R15 TP Hybrid


Titleist 915H Hybrid

The Takeaway

The 915H incorporates the same technology as the 915D driver, taking advantage of their Active Recoil Channel, Ultra Thin Face, High MOI, and Precision Fit System. What you get is an all-black, pear-shaped head that is on the larger side fitted with another super quality shaft from Mitsubishi. This Hybrid offers the consumer nothing but high-end components like all Titleist products do.

Who’s it for?

I would say this hybrid is for pretty much anyone, except those looking for a smaller shape and even less spin. With all the adjustments and shaft offerings available, the 915H will fit one of the largest group of players out there.

Final Take

At first, I struggled with hooking the 915H badly as I changed my target line to against the grain. After quickly changing back to my original target line, Viola! I saw nothing but high frozen ropes that produced solid distance and a great feeling. Sound-wise, the high, ear-piercing noise that accompanied the driver was gone and replaced by a much more appealing, solid click sound. The head shape was on the larger side for my eyes, but this may provide more confidence with many types of players.

Shop Titleist 915H Hybrid


Titleist 915H Hybrid

The Takeaway

The 915Hd incorporates the same technology as the 915D driver, taking advantage of their Active Recoil Channel, Ultra Thin Face, High MOI, and Precision Fit System. What you get is a smaller, all-black, pear-shaped head with less offset when compared to the 915H. Add in a quality shaft from Mitsubishi and the 915Hd offers the consumer nothing but high-end components like all Titleist products do.

Who’s it for?

The 915Hd with its smaller head shape, minimal offset and lower spin rate will raise the eyebrows of the high-speed, high-launch players that are looking for a lower launch angle and spin rate from their hybrids.

Final Take

Looking at the 915Hd really instills the feeling of a player’s hybrid to me. Clean, compact with very little offset scream knock me onto a Par 5 please! My ball flight was lower than the 915H, but not by much. The feel was super solid, and the sound created that nice and crisp click enjoyed many players. With the Precision Fit System, I was able to go into my favored open face and flatter lie setup. I also loved the feel of the Mitsubishi shaft, which performed fantastically for me. Both the 915H and 915Hd are wonderful hybrids.

Shop Titleist 915Hd Hybrid


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Bob Gomavitz

Bob Gomavitz Age: 59 Handicap: 4.6 Introduced to Golf: Age 10 Years Playing: 47 Hole In Ones: 2 Double Eagles: 1 Years in the Golf Industry: 14 Rounds Per Year: Over 100 Favorite PGA Tour Course Played: TPC Sawgrass Favorite Local Course Played: Royal Colwood Victoria, B.C. Most Famous Golfer that I played with: Fred Couples Most Famous Person that I played with: Kenny G (High School Teammate) Current WITB Driver: Taylormade 2016 M2 9.5 45" D-3 Graphite Design Tour Ad 60 Stiff 3 Wood: Taylormade RBZ 13 Degree TS Oban Revenge 7 Stiff 43.25” D-3 Hybrid: Taylormade R1118 Degree Matrix Altus Stiff Hybrid: Taylormade R11 Rescue 21 Degree Matrix Altus Stiff Irons: Taylormade Burner 2.0 4-PW KBS Tour Stiff Std Lie, Lofts and Lengths Wedges: Taylormade Rac Black 54 Degree TT DG Wedge Flex Wedges: Callaway X Tour 58 Degree MD TT DG Wedge Flex Putter: Odyssey Versa 90 degree #7 Super Stroke 3.0 34” Ball: Titleist Pro V1x, Srixon Z Star XV Yellow Trackman Driver Swing Info Club Head Speed: 98-101 Ball Speed: 148-151 Angle of Attack: +1.7 to +2.6 Launch Angle: 12.7 to 14.1 Spin: 2400-2750 Angle of Descent: 39.8 to 37.3 Carry: 234-242 yards Distance: 258-272 yards Path: 0.7 to 2.4

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10 Comments

  1. I found the reviews to be informative and helpful. I found myself torn between the Adams hybrids and the Ping G30s. They appear to be the best for my game. Given how much hybrids have helped my game, I want to be sure to get the right ones. These reviews will make it easier for my purchases

  2. Very helpful reviews! I had a hard time with my hybrid initially but once I learned how to play the club it has become a necessary tool in my bag!

  3. Well done Bob. Thanks for very thorough & useful 2015 hybrids review. It reaffirms what I know about my ongoing brand favorites & definitely makes we want to go out & try several other new models in the field.

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